The Pedal File – More Great Pedals Made by More Little Guys

Hi.
I like pedals.  You like pedals.  He likes pedals.  She likes pedals.  We all like pedals.

Today’s topic is another attempt to bring you up a notch on the pedal popularity scale.  Whenever I find some cool pedals that I think are obscure and/or weird and/or versatile, I like to let you know about it so you can pretend to all your friends you found it first.  Check out these two exciting pedals from two different little guy builders.

Warm Star Electronics – Shape shift Mountain

Scrolling the webs, I came across this pedal and was instantly intrigued.  A compact yet super versatile Filter & LFO pedal?  I’m down like Donald Trump at an all you can eat baby buffet.  (Correct me if I’m wrong, but I assume he eats babies for breakfast, no?)

The Pedal File - Warm Star Electronics Shape Shift Mountain

Shape Shift Mountain is  the first pedal offered by Warm Star (built in collaboration with Delptronics, maker of eurorack modules, interactive music exhibits, PCBs, and other electronic design type stuff), which to me is a hopeful indication of more cool synth style pedals in the future.

At heart, the Shape Shift Mountain is a voltage controlled 24 db/octave low pass filter with an integrated LFO.  It uses the classic SSM2044 filter chip used in a bunch of synths, but most notably the Korg Mono/Poly synths (if Korg used it, it’s gotta be good).homer

As the name implies, applying a multi-faceted filter, plus LFO to your guitar signal can give you mystical mountain sherpa abilities to traverse your guitar (or anything with a 1/4″ output) across precarious tone-scapes you didn’t know existed.  The cool part is that you don’t really have to worry about avalanches.  Unless you happen to have a jam spot right next to a mountain.

How versatile can the Shape Shift Mountain be?  That’s just a silly question.  Well, silly, for starters you could use this thing’s filter as an EQ of sorts to carve and whittle frequencies to boost leads or thin out/fatten up your signal, which are things guitar players do when they really want to cut through the mix.  You could also employ this pedal as a unique distortion and really fuck your signal up with the gain, gnarl, and resonance controls.  Or, you could tame it as the versatile filter and modulation source it is for filter sweeping and vibrato/trill sounds.

Like that mirror in Harry Potter that shows you your biggest desire or something (I don’t remember, I read that book like 15 years ago), the Shape Shift Mountain can show you what it is you desire.  At least as far as filters and LFOs go.  It would probably not be right for anyone looking for a steady, consistent, one-trick pony relationship with a pedal.

There’s only 50 being made in the first run (going now!) so you should probably get over to their page and tell them you want one before it’s too late!

Warm Star’s Demo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5uG2QovabI

Tweakables
Cutoff – determines cutoff frequency of the filter.  Select the frequencies that shall pass or shall not pass.
Resonance – amplifies or accentuates the cutoff frequency.
Gnarl – in the video it sounds like this knob generates a second frequency one octave below the original signal, but I can’t say for sure.
Gain – the gain seems like it could add an octave as well, but at any rate I’m sure adds gain and distorts the signal.
LFO Rate – rate of the LFO.
LFO Slope – control how the LFO fades in and out.
LFO Amount – depth of the LFO.
CV inputs – control cutoff/resonance via CV signals.
CV out – for LFO.  Integrate this with your synth or CV enabled gear.
Expression inputs – LFO rate, amount, cutoff, resonance.  Control a knob with your foot so you can do synth stuff while you play, like sweep the filter.

Switches
High/low – switch between a high/low octave?
Triangle/Square – waveform selector.

There you have it: a promising first venture out to pedal sea from a fledgling company.  I think I speak for more than just me when I say I look forward to what Warm Star does in the future.

Check out www.warmstarelectronics.com for more info.


Parasit Studios – Into the Unknown Guitar Synth Deluxe

Possibly the synthiest synth pedal ever?

Parasit Studios isn’t just a pedal manufacturer, but a real live Swedish recording studio that also happens to make DIY pedal kits, many of which are pretty unique synth pedal-type designs.  People who produce/engineer records probably have a good understanding of sound, so why couldn’t they make a great sounding pedal (case in point – Recovery Effects)?

The Pedal File - Parasit Studio Into the Unknown Guitar SynthThe Into The Unknown (ITU) is a fine example of the above situation.

According to Parasit helmsman Frederik Lyxzen, what makes the circuit of the Into the Unknown pedal special is ‘that the octave up part is based on a frequency controlled oscillator so it doesn’t scramble chords like [the] usual octave circuit, and it tracks well over the entire fretboard…it can be very controlled, but also make super-glitchy sounds, fuzz, theremin sounds, synthy octaves down and up, flanger-ish modulation, drone-ish noise, oscillation, and more.’

The Into The Unknown’s filter and LFO sounds are similar to the Moog Freqbox, onlyurkel the ITU seems a lot more musical and controllable.  The fuzz on it’s own is one of the closest to sounding like an actual synth I’ve come across.  Be warned, this pedal sounds pretty amazing and will surprise you with it’s satisfying ability to produce sounds that are strange and otherworldly, yet beautiful and inspiring…like Urkel.

Needless to say, when I saw there was a limited run of 25 being sold, I had to jump on it.  Don’t fret though (terrible guitar pun), if you’re handy with a soldering iron, you can always get one of the DIY kits, or you can sign up for the mailing list and be notified of the next run.

Parasit’s demo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5uG2QovabI

Tweakables
Mix – blends between straight square wave fuzz and the synthesized VCO signal coming from the CD4046 PLL chip.
Sub – how much octave down you add to the signal.
Gate – sets input sensitivity.  Can be very gated or glitchy, and can self-oscillate.
Rate – controls the speed of the LFO.
Level – controls overall output.
Filter – controls cutoff of the resonant filter.  The middle position has a strong resonant peak.  Check out the filter sweeps in the demo video.  Super nice.
Track – controls the tracking speed of the VCO.  Turn it up for a slow attack/decay of the octave up or down for a faster attack/decay.
Warp – the man who built this doesn’t even know how to describe this control.  It’s interactive with the track knob and has a strong effect on the character of the modulation.  Can produce ring mod sounds.

SwitchesThese switches are independent from the mix controls so you can add octaves to either the fuzz signal or VCO signal.
Octave down -Toggles between one or two octaves down (down position – two octaves down, up position – one octave down).
Octave up – The VCO signal will be one or two octaves up depending on the switch (down position – one octave up, up position – two octaves up).
LFO – Wave Shape selector/turn off.

I think you’ll agree this pedal is more than worth it’s weight in synths.

Check out  www.parasitstudios.se for more info.

*Bonus: Interesting Article on LFOs and how they can shape your sound- http://www.emusician.com/gear/1332/the-ins-and-outs-of-lfos/36695

That’s all for now.  Thanks for reading!  Make sure to be quick if you want one to claim one of these fine pedals, and as always, feel free to let me know any thoughts you might have.  Stay tuned for video demos!

Love,

Nick
The Pedal File

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The Pedal File: Catalinbread’s Montavillian Ambient Echo

Good day, pedal filers!  It’s official, your favorite source of wacky pedal news can now be found at ThePedalFile.com!  That’s right, I guess I’m here to stay for a little while.  That’s good news for you and bad news for all the pedals I’ve yet to encounter.  May this be their warning…  Anyway, I’d love to tell you what else is new around the luxurious offices at The Pedal File HQ (hint: it’s a pedal) – the Montavillian Ambient Echo by Catalinbread Mechanisms of Music of Portland, OR.  My dedicated staff slaves and I love the creamy space feelings this unit provides, like being engulfed in a UFO tractor beam (what you’ve never felt that?).

Catalinbread has a full line of effects worth looking into, but delay is where they stand up and out, fully erect.  I posted before about their Echorec pedal, which is an impressive recreation of the Binson Echorec, as well their Zero Point flanger and Anchtithon fuzz/tremolo/mushroom pedal.  They also offer the Belle Epoch, their take on remaking the sound of the Maestro Echoplex EP-3.  As you can see, Catalinbread love their classic delays as much as Americans love rehashed music and cinema.  It comes as no surprise then that Catalinbread would be able to engineer a useful delay pedal with features that straddle the line between old school and modern, analog and digital.  (I’m going to coin a new term here – Digilog….  Trademark.)

Your first time with the Montavillian you will become enchanted, paralyzed, unable to escape the comforting trails of delay even though you recognize your own mortality could be at risk because, you know, if you don’t take a break from playing with pedals and at least eat something you may not make it more than a few days.  I barely was able to break myself away and survive.  Always remember, just because your pedals are machines, that does not make you one (Do pedals dream of electric sheep?).

I’m not here to blow smoke or talk in hyperbole (mmmaybe a little, but mostly just in ridiculous and absurd metaphors).  I bought this pedal, and I really love it because of its unique, versatile, and superb aural qualities.   (As you may know, that’s pretty much my checklist for an effects pedal.)

The Montavillian Echo uses the PT2399 chip (used more commonly in lo-fi delays like the Recovery Effects Cutting Room Floor, Caroline Kilobyte, Wampler Tape Echo and many others), but in Catalinbread’s words, “…rather than slavishly following the datasheet, we threw it out and ventured out on our own, using our ears to guide us, and what we achieved is a fantastic sounding delay.”  Indeed they have.  All I can say is their ears must be like freaking sherpas if they led them to such a majestic mountain of delayness.  Maybe I just don’t know shit about designing pedals and pairing components, but I’m surprised that a chip with such a lo-fi reputation could produce a delay so beautiful, so warm, so inviting.

The true Jesus fart (that’s what I call miracles) behind the great tone of this pedal is that this delay does not use companding to process your signal.  Companding is a combination of the words compress(ing) and expand(ing).  Basically, this means that in most analog/BBD-emulating delay pedals, your input signal is compressed, processed, then expanded back to input strength to the output.  Instead of the delay trails getting dirtier as they go, the Montavillian maintains clarity on the delay trails creating an almost reverby, pad-like effect.  (This is my favorite delay to get a realistic spacey synth tone when paired with fuzz and/or octave pedals like the EQD Bit Commander or Iron Ether Subterranea.)  It doesn’t take an engineering degree to understand that the less your signal is processed, the better and more pure your tone should be.  No companding = no strangling then smoothing out of your signal.  Your signal slides in there unimpeded like Bill Cosby at cocktail hour.

Tweakables: Quoted text from the manual

REPEATS“feeds signal from the output of the delay line to the input. This control allows for a single repeat all the way to self oscillation.”  It doesn’t take a lot to make this thing freak out.  In a good way.  Like the equivalent of a bunch of hippies flailing around not being able to control the urge to let their hands chase each other at a Phish concert.  (Okay bad example because nobody likes watching hippies chase their hands at jam festivals…Okay well, I do, for a good laugh.)
MIX“this knob is traditional in the way it mixes into your dry path the amount of echo you want. What is not traditional is the amount of boost it permits you to add… So many echo pedals out there can barely tune the repeat to unity with the gain. This is not at all the case with the Montavillian Echo! You can make your repeats much louder than the dry signal. This comes in really handy for short repeats for a dramatic doubling effect as well as self oscillation freakouts.”  You can impress your friends with these slick delay tricks that can’t be pulled off with everyday delay pedals.  The result can be pretty strange since the repeats are louder than your pick attack; it almost sounds like reverse delay.  Seriously I don’t know of another delay that can do this, but please correct me if I’m wrong.  An extra point shall be awarded for this feature on the official Pedal File Pedestal.
TIME“this knob allows for a wide range of delay times, ranging from around 60ms all the way up to over 600ms max time.”  I prefer 1000ms of delay time, but I realized with this pedal that 600ms is plenty for most delay effects.  I have not really found it to be limiting.
CUT “this knob is a really neato control that I haven’t seen before on an echo. It’s function is to sweep from about 400Hz to about 1500Hz, lowpass filter… When the knee sweeps to the high side it gives a nice little bump in the mids right before the subtle fall off. Tuning this knob allows you to sweep from old school BBD dark filtering to a clear repeat. It gives you the power to adjust your echoes so that they sit in the mix perfectly against your dry signal. This control also functions to EQ the tonality of self-oscillations.”  All of the knobs on this pedal are quite sensitive with a large range of tweakability.  The cut knob is probably the most important as this is how you go from brighter repeats to dark and warm analog style wash.  Herein lies the secret to getting versatile delay tones out of just one pedal.  No matter where you set it, the repeats trail off getting darker as they go, like a low pass filter city going to sleep.  Don’t be fooled, even the brighter settings retain a certain warmness and wrap your ears in a big fur blanket that drags you down by the fire to make sweet love.

There is something soothing about the Montavillian’s tones, more so than any delay I’ve played, like listening to ocean waves, Air (the band), or the cries for help of innocent pedals.  If delay ain’t your thing, but you want an interesting ‘boost’, you can use it like an old school analog delay preamp that can add a perceived boost and a bit of pleasing harmonics to your signal.  It instantly adds more balls to dirt pedals and is perfect for getting all psychedelic up in there.  Whether you drop more acid than Wayne Coyne or you play for Jesus in your worship band, you will love this pedal (and Jesus will too).

The Montavillian is a pedal that you plug into and you can’t make it sound bad, unless you play blues rock.  Or hair metal.  Don’t do that out of the privacy of your own home.  Otherwise you’ll be fine.

Check out www.catalinbread.com for more info

That’s all for now.  Leave me a comment to let me know your thoughts, and thanks for reading!

Love,

Nick
The Pedal File

More Cool New Pedals of 2014!!

Hallo und guten tag!  Oh, sorry that’s German.  Oh well, good luck translating that sentence…   I try to keep up on the happenings of the pedal world so I can then report to you, the pedal enthusiast.  This year has seen some really unique and innovative designs – so many that I could make this a big long list.  But because I know you have the attention span of Honey Boo Boo in a butter factory, I’ve narrowed the list down to three pedals.  I want to bring your attention to a couple of boxes that are worth a percentage of your hard earned dollars from whatever it is that you do for money (you dirty person).  Get out your notebook, take some notes, and go buy these pedals.

MXR Phase 99

The Pedal File - MXR Phase 99

MXR has some cool pedals in their line, but they often get overlooked for other more boutique brands.  A lot of their designs are simple, standard effects – offering only a few knobs for tweaking, but they sound good as evidenced by the many recordings in which you can hear them by the many artists who endorse them such as Beats Antique and Dweezil Zappa.  But lately, it seems like the engineers over there have decided they wanted to do something a little different.  The MXR Phase 99 basically takes two Phase 90 circuits, joins them at the hip, and adds some nice tweakable features that I was surprised to see on a pedal from them.  A series/parallel switch?  Sweet.  A vintage switch?  Sexy.  A sync switch to synchronize the rates of both circuits?  I like.  I’ll elaborate under tweakables.

Tweakables:
Speed 1 & 2 – controls the phase shift speed on both circuits.  You can set one fast, one slow, or however the hell you want to get unique phase tones.
Series/Parallel switch – run the circuits in series (circuit 1 into circuit 2 to create a more intense effect with exaggerated frequency cuts and peaks) or parallel (circuit 1 & 2 stay separated).
Vintage switch – engage a vintage voicing for the phasing.
Sync switch – like I said above, synchronizes both circuits to speed 1 rate.

Do you want to have classic phase tones, but with added flexibility and tweaking options?  Check this one out!


Check out www.jimdunlop.com for more info

Strymon Deco

The Pedal File - Strymon Deco

This pedal was just announced, and as soon as I read about it/listened to it, I knew I would more than likely own it someday.  The Deco (I assume it’s named after the popular art of the time of tape reels) is all about emulating old tape effects that engineers used in the early days of recording.  Offering a slew of effects like tape saturation for warmth/compression and overdrive, doubletracking for slapback, tape flanging, tape echo, and chorus, and with bypass switches for the saturation and doubletracker, it all feels too much like a wet dream…(what, you don’t dream about pedals?)

Tweakables:
Saturation – smooths out the sound with compression and fattens it up with a transparent overdrive.
Blend – mix between the tape saturation and doubletracker controls.
Lag Time – sets the delay offset like you were controlling a ‘lag deck’ and ‘reference deck’.  This is what gives you the doubletracking, slapback, flange, chorus effects, and tape echo (up to 500ms delay) effects.  Such a big and powerful knob…
Volume – duh, controls the output volume, stupid!
Wobble – adds random modulation from subtle to extreme just like tape would.
Type switch
– sum: the ‘tape decks’ are in phase
– invert: ‘lag deck’ is phase inverted
– bounce: right channel of the ‘lag deck’ is phase-inverted and bounced to the left channel input for ping-pong stereo effects, or a double-repeat effect when running in mono.

One pedal that can provide such a bounty of effects is surely worth a spot on your pedalboard.


Check out www.strymon.net for more info

Earthquaker Devices Afterneath

The Pedal File - Earthquaker DevicesAfterneath

If you haven’t heard of Earthquaker Devices at this point I’ll assume you’ve been living under a rock or you have just arrived to this planet from a distant solar system.  Welcome to Earth, watch out for humans – they suck.  But they build these things we call pedals, so I guess the ones who make them don’t completely suck, and Earthquaker Devices is on top of the pile of not-sucking.  Just released at Summer NAMM, the Afterneath is yet another unique EQD take on the boring old reverb effect.  The Afterneath is all about transporting you to another world that isn’t above or underneath ours  – it is after…neath (another angle would be a future world).  This one uses a ‘swarm of short delays to create wild and cavernous reverbs and scattered, short rhythmic delays with bizarre characteristics.’  It can self-oscillate, be bright or warm, and generally offers an abnormal and unconventionally open and ambient playground for the reverb lover.

Tweakables:
Length – Controls the decay length of the reverb.
Diffuse – Adjusts the spread of the reverb. Sharper with more attack counter clockwise, more ambient and washy as you turn it clockwise.
Dampen – Clockwise for brighter tones, counter clockwise for darker tones.
Drag – This digital reverb is made up of a bunch of short delays, this separates the delay lines creating a stuttering, pingy effect. This is the coolest control on the Afterneath, we highly advise slowly turning this while you let notes ring out for a cool warped speed effect. More delay as you turn it counter clockwise, more reverb as you turn it clockwise.
Reflect – Controls the regeneration of the reverb, turn clockwise for more wash and echos, counterclockwise for less. This will self oscillate if turned up high.
Mix – Blends the wet signal into the dry. Though it does not actually go full wet, it will gradually lower the clean level as you turn it clockwise and give the appearance of full wet.  This makes me ‘full wet’ just reading about it…

If you’re tired of all those reverb pedals that are so straight-forward, perhaps you should look into this one.


Check out www.earthquakerdevices.com for more info

So there you have it!  Three pedals that are new, exciting, and worth your time.  Feel free to let me know what you think, or what you consider to be sweet new pedals.

Thanks for reading.

Love,

Nick
The Pedal File

Pedal Feature Update – MAK Crazy Sound Technology Space Reverb

Hello fellow pedal aficionados!  Welcome back to my ramblings.  It’s been a whole month since we last met and I’ve really missed forcing you to read what I write.  It fills me with sick pleasure, not unlike that of effects pedals.  Today I’m going to elaborate on my previous post about an obscure effects pedal company.  Yes my friends, I finally received the MAK Crazy Sound Technology Space Reverb!  Yay!

mak_000

It only takes 29 days to send a package from the Ukraine to Ohio.  In case you were wondering.


I used to think reverb was boring, like why would I ever need more than one reverb pedal?  But there’s lots of crunchy-outer-coated-gooey-centered reverb-ery pedal flavors out there, some with one knob, some with controls over every parameter.  It turns out the world of reverb is much bigger than I ever suspected.  After some exploration I realize it’s cool, not boring, and useful because it adds extra depth and dimension to your tone.  It’s an effect that can take you out of whatever room you’re in and place you in a bigger room, or hall, or chamber, or canyon, etc.  Or you can just throw on a little and be subtle with things.  I have reverb on my amp that I have set low enough that you only really notice when it’s off.  I like that.  However I realized recently that sometimes it’s cool to make your chords or leads or farts sound really really big.  Something to make you feel like a rock star at some big arena, like Steve Perry at The Q.  I still leave a subtle amount of reverb on the amp all the time, and have the pedal out front for the big tones.  The Space Reverb is perfect for this.  It makes for a great subtle reverb, but excels at those big tones I’m talking about.

I was drawn to the Space Reverb primarily because it sounds superb and has versatile controls.  What really sold me was the multi-mode toggle switch.  Nicky likey multiple functions on one pedal.  Why?  Versatility, stupid!  This pedal can easily be your tool chest of reverb.  Whether you want familiar sounds or crazy ass ones you’ve got everything you need to put yourself, your band, and your audience out to sea.  In space.  And for real, the shimmer mode can get pretty freaky.  Like when they find out the alien is on the ship.  Or you can be a pussy and stay in the shallow end of the reverb pool with your swimmies and wimpy short room reverbs.  Just kidding short reverb has a place too!  …And all this can be achieved with one pedal!

Tweakables:
Decay – sets the reverb decay from a short room slap-back verb all the way to putting your amp in caves inside caves inside a volcano on Mars while you play and listen from Earth.  It can be barely there or it can be a powerful intoxicating cloud that takes you over like you’re locked in the garage with the car running.  Be sure to get some fresh air and don’t got lost in any hazy corners of your mind.  Or jam room.
Hi – sets amount of hi frequency you want in the reverb or effected signal (controls the high intervals of the shimmer mode)
Low – sets amount of low frequency you want in the reverb or effected signal (controls the low intervals of the shimmer mode)
Mix – wet/dry mix for adding the clean signal back in.  Every pedal should have a mix knob!  Retain just enough pick attack to make your playing stand out over the reverb washes.  With this maxed out, it gets reallllllllly spacey.
3-Way Toggle:
Plate – emulates a plate reverb.  Not a dinner plate, silly, metal plates.  Not many pedals do the plate reverb.  It’s a different sound than a spring or room reverb.  It has a metallic quality to the reflections.  It’ll make your surf riffs sound a little sweeter.
Ambient – is what it is.  The higher you set the mix knob the more your intitial attack will disappear and the deeper you will descend into a blissful watery grave.  All the way up there is no attack, which creates a sort of reverse reverb or swell effect.  With the decay maxed it sounds kind of like a freeze pedal, or an analog delay softly self-oscillating reminiscent of an Echoplex.  It creates a beautiful and gentle wash behind what you’re playing, like a modulated infinite delay.  So great for adding drama and texture to your tone, and it even works great on keyboard.
Shimmer – sounds kind of like a harmonizer.  In octaves and 5ths possibly?  It’s hard to say, it seems to change interval depending on where you’re fretting the neck, lower fretted notes make a nasty tritone.  It’s easy to get organ or synth pad sounds by controlling the shimmering octaves with the hi and low knobs.  If you turn the octaves down, the reverb is has a hall or cathedral character.  Also with the hi knob down and low at different positions I was able to get a very nice low octave (electric) bass guitar sound and reproduce low strings like cello or bowed upright bass.

As much as I’d love it if this thing wasn’t named and labeled in English (something about globalization?), the name ‘Space Reverb’ certainly describes the pedal more efficiently than I ever could…  Spacey, atmospheric, trippy, ethereal, ambient, etc. are all good words to describe this pedal.  With any mode selected you’ve got instant depth to the depths of depth, man.  Don’t take my word for it, check out my demo video and hear it for yourself.


One thing is for sure.  MAK has my seal of approval on pedals, I only wish they were more readily available in the States.  What do you think, does this get your approval?  Don’t be a-scared, you’ve got a computer to hide behind!  If you’re like me and you have to have one, send them a Facebook message or snag one off EBay while you can.

MAK’s Facebook Page

I wish them the best of luck with their pedal endeavors.  I’m sure they’ll do well if they keep on making sweet and inspiring pedals!

Thanks for reading.

Love,

Nick
The Pedal File

Pedal Feature – Catalinbread’s Echorec

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Howdy pardners!  I was moseying down a dusty internet trail looking at delay pedals when one caught my eye that I think is worth sharing.  So everyone knows analog delays sound really good and most of them are at least loosely based on the sound of an Echoplex (fun and coincidental fact [for me at least]: In 1962, the Echoplex patent was bought by a company called Market Electronics based in Cleveland, Ohio.  Yay Ohio!).  Don’t get me wrong, they sound amazing, but I’m becoming a little desensitized to all the delay pedals that sound like another tape delay.

The silly Portlandia-dwelling hipsters at Catalinbread took a look at recreating another popular, but perhaps less well-known echo unit, the Binson Echorec.  The Binson Echorec is mostly known for being a big part of Pink Floyd‘s sound, as well as being used by other famous musician types in the 60’s.  The major difference of the Echorec was it’s use of an analog magnetic drum recorder instead of a tape loop.  It incorporated 4 playback heads and a spinning magnetic drum as its recording mechanism.  According to Catalinbread, ‘The Binson…has long captivated musicians for both its rhythmic and ambient characteristics. We managed to include all the features of the original (and then some) while still keeping it in a small standard pedal sized enclosure.’  Way to go!

Check out the video by Pro Guitar Shop.

Other tweakables include:
• The Swell knob controls the number of repeats regenerated – from a single repeat of each playback head to infinite repeats.

• The Tone control tilts the EQ of the repeats from dark and fat to bright and thin. Dark settings makes the repeats sit in the background. Bright settings emphasizes the attack, great for playing off the syncopated rhythms of the multi-head arrangement.  Makes me think of The Edge.

• The original Echorec had a maximum delay time of 300ms. The delay time on the Catalinbread Echorec goes from about 40ms -1000ms. And the cool thing is you can twist the Delay Time knob in real-time to get speeding-up / slowing-down, spaceship warp landing sounds!  Those are cool 🙂

• Mix knob goes from full dry to full wet giving a lot of flexibility to use the Echorec in a variety of situations, even wet/dry rigs by setting the Mix full wet.  I like being fully wet.

• The original Echorec had a 12 position switch which controlled the various playback head configurations. Since the original was mechanical with the disc only able to go one speed, not all combinations were available for use. The Catalinbread Echorec changes all that. With the ability to vary the delay time on the single playback head, we were able to include all combinations, which include rhythmic patterns not available before.  Sounds like a sweet idea.

I have to admit I might end up with this on my board.  What do you think about this pedal?  Do you have a favorite delay pedal?  Leave a comment and let me know!

Thanks for reading.

Love,

Nick
The Pedal File